LN324-91

                             CHAPTER XXIII

                       EXTRACTING CI INFORMATION

INTRODUCTION:

     Wheedling is applied always with a specific purpose in mind. The
objective, or the information desired, is the SUBJECT'S determining factor, of
the wheedler, and the environment.

GENERAL FACTS:

     A.    Definition of WHEEDLING: Wheedling is the technique of obtaining
the greatest amount of information/useful intelligence, from a person or
source, so that the person does not know our purpose.

     1.    Before starting the wheedling there are requirements of CI
collection to be reviewed:

     a.    Identify the required specific information.

     b.    Identify the wheedling objective.

     2.    Select the SUBJECT of the wheedling according to his access to, or
knowledge of, the information desired.

     3.    Obtain and evaluate all information available in regards to the
SUBJECT in the wheedling:

     a.    Carry out the review of files and try to obtain the following
information about the SUBJECT:

     1)    History

     2)    Motivations

     3)    Emotions

     4)    Psychological nature

     5)    Habits or patterns

     6)    Favorite visiting places. (bars, restaurants, discos, etc.)

     7)    Favorite hobbies


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LN324-91 8) What level of knowledge he has about security that person has. 9) If he has been previously used in other wheedling intents by other CI agents. 4. Determine in what place/specific environment the wheedling will take place. a. Select the place where the approximation to the SUBJECT/Source will take place. NOTE: A SUBJECT must be approached in a natural environment to avoid raising his suspicion. b. Obtain al the information about the place selected: 1) Identify all the place's irregular traces or facts. 2) Identify what type of clothes will be required to enter that place. (Formal: shirt and tie; Informal: shorts, jeans, etc). 3) Identify the money requirements. (It is a place where food or products are expensive or cheap). 4) Identify possible security problems 5) Identify if the place has been used previously as a wheedling place. c. Select the date and time more desirable for the approximation. 5. Select for yourself a logical story (cover), one that could be credible and is according WITH the situation. The history must explain: a. The reason you have to be in the chosen place for the approximation. b. The agent's actions during the conversation. 6. Carry out the approximation using one of two approximation techniques: Flattery and Provocation, or any variation of these two techniques as mentioned below: 217
LN324-91 a. Use the flattery method: 1) Appeal to the ego, pride of the SUBJECT. Give him (SUBJECT) the opportunity to show pride or so that he flatters himself about his triumphs and gains. 2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT is an expert in a specific area, topic or theme. In this manner you will give him the opportunity to feel as if he is the teacher and you are the pupil. 3) Offer him (SUBJECT) valid and honest assistance. 4) Discuss areas of mutual interest. (Hobbies, work, sports, etc.) NOTE: The agent must have a good knowledge of the theme he thinks he will choose to show mutual interest (that is to be able to follow the conversation professionally) b. Use the approach method of provocation to open the conversation WITH the SUBJECT: 1) Adopt an attitude as if you do not believe what the SUBJECT says: "What you say, is very difficult to believe, you have to explain it to me in more detail to see if it is true". 2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT really does not know anything of what he is talking about. 7. Once the approach has taken place, take the conversation to the area of interest: a. Try to obtain more information give him answers that the SUBJECT finds obscure and that require more information to clarify them. b. Ask the SUBJECT for more. information when his answers are not clear enough: ("I agree WITH you, although, what does it mean...."). NOTE: Be persistent without being abusive, bored or insolent. 218
LN324-91 c. Present a hypothetical situation that could be associated WITH an idea or thought expressed by the SUBJECT. NOTE: Many persons that normally do not make comments about a real situation, will give his opinion about hypothetical situations. d. Use your imagination and initiative to keep complete control of the conversation at all times. 8. Finish the (unclear]a. Use the flattery method: 1) Appeal to the ego, pride of the SUBJECT. Give him (SUBJECT) the opportunity to show pride or so that he flatters himself about his triumphs and gains. 2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT is an expert in a specific area, topic or theme. In this manner you will give him the opportunity to feel as if he is the teacher and you are the pupil. 3) Offer him (SUBJECT) valid and honest assistance. 4) Discuss areas of mutual interest. (Hobbies, work, sports, etc.) NOTE: The agent must have a good knowledge of the theme he thinks he will choose to show mutual interest (that is to be able to follow the conversation professionally). b. Use the approach method of provocation to open the conversation WITH the SUBJECT: 1) Adopt an attitude as if you do not believe what the SUBJECT says: "What you say, is very difficult to believe, you have to explain it to me in more detail to see if it is true". 2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT really does not know anything of what he is talking about. 7. Once the approach has taken place, take the conversation to the area of interest: a. Try to obtain more information give him answers that the SUBJECT finds obscure and that require more information to clarify them. b. Ask the SUBJECT for more information when his answers are not clear enough: ("I agree WITH you, although, what does it mean...."). NOTE: Be persistent without being abusive, bored or insolent. 219
LN324-91 c. Present a hypothetical situation that could be associated WITH an idea or thought expressed by the SUBJECT. NOTE: Many persons that normally do not make comments about a real situation, will give his opinion about hypothetical situations. d. Use your imagination and initiative to keep complete control of the conversation at all times. 8. Finish the wheedling as soon as you obtain all the information desired: a. Change the conversation theme to others before leaving and bidding goodbye to the SUBJECT. b. Present various non-pertinent themes to avoid that the SUBJECT discovers its true purpose. (Wheedle intelligence information). c. Finish the conversation in a normal manner. 9. Take notes of all the official funds expenses. B. Prepare the required reports. 220
LN324-91 CHAPTER XXIV DETECTING CI TARGETS INTRODUCTION: The identification of CI targets are done through the intelligence rules. A data base WITH a line and block box, used in connection WITH existing black, grey and white lists, intelligence reports and additional information from the police agencies, army and other agencies, provides us WITH basic information required to identify the potential CI targets. GENERAL FACTS: A. Review the CI estimate to determine the hostile threat: 1. Identify those threats to security that are of an immediate nature. 2. Identify anticipated future threats. NOTE: The selection of CI targets must be based in an evaluation of a complete hostile threat. B. Identify the specific CI targets of the local area: a. The CI targets are of interest due to the threat that they present, or the usefulness to the Armed Forces. CI targets include: a. PERSONALITIES (SEE FIGURES #2, 3 and 4): that could or not be friendly or hostile. b. INSTALLATIONS (SEE FIGURE #5): that represent a threat to the national security. c. ORGANIZATIONS AND TeamS (SEE FIGURE #6): that represent a threat to the national security. Its threat perhaps is not openly detectable due to their undercover operation methods. d. DOCUMENTS AND MATERIALS (SEE FIGURE #7): WITH value to the intelligence or the counter intelligence. NOTE: Use the CI Work Sheet (SEE FIGURE #1) as the principal paper to assist in the development of the targets: 221
LN324-91 3. Obtain information about the potential CI targets in the local area: a. Extract the local targets from the CI target lists at national level. b. Extract information from the existing Black lists (SEE FIGURE #2), White (SEE FIGURE #3), and Grey (SEE FIGURE #4). c. Extract information from the intelligence files, CI data base, and similar files. d. Obtain information from: 1) Civilian Affairs and Psychological Operations (G5) 2) Local intelligence units 3) Police elements C. Categorize the CI targets identified by the specialty or function. Examples: 1) Espionage agents 2) Sabotage specialists 3) Messengers 4) Camps or bases 5) Communications and link routes NOTE: To categorize the targets in this manner, it is essential that the history detailed information is obtained from the same source that was used to identify them. D. Assign priorities to the targets: 1. Determine the priority of each Target based on: a. The threat to the national security that the target represents. b. The urgency or the need to neutralize or exploit the target. c. The future capacities that await the target. d. The capacities of the units responsible to neutralize or exploit the targets. 222
LN324-91 2. Assign a numerical priority to each target: a. The numerical designations are always expressed in roman numerals (I, IV, XI). b. The numerical designation emphasizes the relative importance or the value of the CI targets. c. The numerical designation expresses the level of interest of the target. NOTE: If a target has been assigned a priority at a level higher than the Command, you at your level cannot alter this priority designation. The local CI elements will assign priorities to targets locally developed. E. Assign the responsibilities of the units to neutralization or exploitation of each target: 1. Determine the capacities of the units to carry out neutralization or exploitation missions based on: a. Amount of personnel b. Equipment available c. Specific experience 2. Identify the need, if any, to request support from the military police, infantry, national police, etc. NOTE: The tactical effort, except in special cases, takes precedence over the neutralization and exploitation of the targets. F. Notify the units of their mission(s). 223
LN324-91 FIGURE #1 CI TARGETS WORK SHEET REFERENCES TO CHARTS, MAPS DATE: _________________________________________________________________ KEYS TO CHART: 1. Target 2. Target classification 3. Priority 4. Localization 5. Team task 6. Team mission (Comments) 7. An administrative number that is written down in chronological order. 8. The classification identifies the target by type, name and provides specific data for identification about the target. 9. The priority is designated WITH roman numerals and is assigned based upon the target classification. 10. The localization will identify the place where you may find the target or if this is not known, it is identified where the target was found the last time. 11. The team's task of identifying the CI team whose mission is to neutralize the target is based in the number of persons available and could include tactical forces, military police and para-military forces. 12. This column is used to make a list of the coordination requirements, communications, specific details of the mission or other specific information required so that the team could fulfill its mission. 224
LN324-91 FIGURE #2 BLACK LISTS THESE CONTAIN THE IDENTITIES AND LOCALIZATIONS OF PERSONS WHOSE CAPTURE AND DETENTION ARE OF FOREMOST IMPORTANCE TO THE ARMED FORCES: EXAMPLES a. Enemy agents known or suspects, persons involved in espionage, sabotage, politics, and subversive persons. b. Hostile para-military guerilla team leaders, known or suspects. c. Political leaders known or suspected as hostile toward the Armed Forces or the political interests of the National Government. d. Known or suspected leaders of enemy governments whose presence in the area of operations represent a threat the national security. e. Collaborators and sympathizers of the enemy, known or suspects whose presence in the area of operations represent a threat to the national security. f. Military and civilian enemies, known or suspected of having participated in intelligence activities, counter-intelligence, security, police or political indoctrination between the troops or among civilians. g. Other personalities identified by the G2 as of immediate detention. This could include local political personalities, chiefs of police, and municipal leaders or leaders of the enemy's government departments. 225
LN324-91 FIGURE #3 GREY LISTS CONTAINS THE IDENTITIES AND LOCALIZATION OF THOSE PERSONALITIES WHOSE INCLINATIONS AND ACTIVITIES TOWARD THE POLITICAL AND MILITARY OBJECTIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT ARE OBSCURE (THAT IS, NOTHING IS KNOWN ABOUT THEM). THEIR INCLINATIONS OR ATTITUDES DOES NOT MATTER, IF THEY HAVE SOME INFORMATION OR SKILLS THAT ARE OF INTEREST TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. THOSE PERSONS WHOSE INCLINATIONS OR POLITICAL MOTIVATIONS REQUIRE MORE EXPLORATION OR EVALUATION BEFORE THEY COULD BE USED EFFECTIVELY BY THE GOVERNMENT CANNOT BE INCLUDED. EXAMPLES a. Defectors or potential defectors of the enemy cause whose motivation or loyalty has not been yet established. b. Persons that have resisted or are believed to have resisted the enemy government and that perhaps are willing to cooperate WITH the Armed Forces of the National Government, but their motivation or loyalty has not yet been established. c. Nuclear scientists, physicists and technical personnel suspected of having participated in development of nuclear projects for the enemy, or nuclear missile programs, against their will. 226
LN324-91 FIGURE #4 WHITE LISTS CONTAIN THE IDENTITIES AND LOCALIZATION OF PERSONS IN AREAS CONTROLLED BY THE ENEMY WHO HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AS OF INTEREST TO THE INTELLIGENCE OR TO THE COUNTER INTELLIGENCE, AND IT IS EXPECTED THAT THEY COULD PROVIDE INFORMATION OR ASSISTANCE IN THE ACCUMULATION OF INTELLIGENCE OR IN THE EXPLOITATION OF AREAS OF INTEREST. NORMALLY THESE PERSONS AGREE WITH, OR FAVORABLY BEND TOWARDS THE BELIEFS OF THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE BASED IN A VOLUNTARY AND COOPERATIVE ATTITUDE. THE DECISION TO PLACE A PERSON IN A WHITE LIST COULD BE AFFECTED BY THE COMBAT SITUATION, THE CRITICAL NEED FOR SPECIALISTS IN THE SCIENTIFIC FIELDS AND OTHER INTELLIGENCE NEEDS. a. Ex-political leaders of a hostile government that were deposed by the hostile political leaders. b. Intelligence agents employed by the National Government. c. Key civilians in the scientific development areas could include members of university faculties, whose loyalty has been established. d. Religious team leaders and other humanitarian team leaders. e. Other persons who could give significant material support to political objectives, scientists and military personnel of the National Government and whose loyalty has been established. 227
LN324-91 FIGURE #5 INSTALLATIONS 1. COMMAND POSTS. 2. COMMUNICATION CENTERS. 3. INVESTIGATION AND DEVELOPMENT CENTERS, LABORATORIES. 4. INSTALLATIONS THAT FORMERLY OR AT PRESENT ARE OCCUPIED BY ENEMY ESPIONAGE AGENCIES, SABOTAGE, AND INSURRECTION, OR ENEMY POLICE ORGANIZATIONS INCLUDING PRISONS. 5. INSTALLATIONS OCCUPIED BY ENEMY INTELLIGENCE ORGANIZATIONS OR SECURITY. 6. BELLIGERENT DEPOTS. 7. EMBASSIES OR HOSTILE GOVERNMENT CONSULATES. 8. MILITARY INSTALLATIONS. 9. PARA-MILITARY Team CAMPS FIGURE #6 ORGANIZATIONS AND TeamS 1. Local or national political party teams, or parties that have goals, beliefs or ideologies contrary or in opposition to the National Government. 2. Para-military organizations including student teams, police, military and veterans, or ex-fighter teams that are hostile towards the National Government. 3. Teams or hostile organizations whose objective is to create dissention or cause restlessness among the civilian population in the area of operations. 4. The central offices of these hostile organizations according to what the Commander of the Armed Forces says will be immediately neutralized. Personalities related WITH these offices will be arrested and detained. 5. Teams that operate undercover or clandestinely and their infrastructure. 6. Intelligence networks. 228
LN324-91 FIGURE #7 DOCUMENTS AND MATERIALS 1. Files at bases, training centers and enemy intelligence schools. 2. Court files (Judicial), prisons, police, and the political administrative executives. 3. National intelligence agencies' files, para-military organizations, and the enemy's secret police agencies. 4. Products or other materials that, if left unguarded could provide support to the enemy guerrilla in the area. 5. Special war materials: a. Chemical war products b. Harmful materials c. New combat products d. Rockets and rocket control centers e. Airships f. Charts and maps warehouses g. Communication equipment, including radios, radars and electronic equipment. 229