Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Open Source Intelligence, Manuales, Textos, Estudios, Enlaces, Inteligencia de Recursos Abiertos.
KS

Documentos de la OTAN sobre OSINT

Mensaje por KS » 17 Ene 2007 23:09

Documentos oficiales de la OTAN sobre OSINT, en formato PDF.

Se explica como buscar información, como analizarla, como perseguir a quien busca esa información, cuanto fiarse, etc. Los documentos están fechados entre 2001 y 2002.

NATO OSINT handbook:
http://documentacion.serviciosdeinteligencia.es/images/10-NATOOSINTHANDBOOK.pdf

NATO OSINT reader:
http://documentacion.serviciosdeinteligencia.es/images/10-NATOOSINTREADER.pdf

NATO Intelligence Exploitation of the Internet:
http://documentacion.serviciosdeinteligencia.es/images/10-NATOINTELLIGENCEEXPLOITATIONOFTHEINTERNET.pdf

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Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Mensaje por Loopster » 26 Ene 2007 13:14

Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

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Artículo interesante sobre OSINT

Mensaje por Loopster » 02 Ago 2007 18:17

Article published Jul 29, 2007
Intelligent intelligence


July 29, 2007


Arnaud de Borchgrave - President John F. Kennedy once said he got "far more out of the New York Times than the CIA." Those were the days when major U.S. newspapers and the three networks maintained foreign bureaus staffed by prize-winning foreign correspondents all over the world.

In those halcyon days, Open Source Intelligence, or OSINT in the espionage vernacular, could be culled from highly knowledgeable foreign correspondents, many of them scholars who had written books about the history and culture of their wide-ranging beats. No more. At the end of World War II, there were 2,500 U.S. foreign correspondents; today, less than 250.

Newspapers, magazines and networks — victims of both a weak dollar and corporate bottom-line bean counters — have cut back foreign news coverage to the point where it no longer qualifies as OSINT. ABC slashed its staff foreign correspondents from 37 in the 1970s to four, according to veteran newsman Ted Koppel. Once-over-lightly foreign reporting — with the exception of major events like wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and 20-minute TV magazine pieces — is not what the intelligence community categorizes as OSINT. Reporters are now increasingly "parachuted" into hot stories abroad for a few days and then home to avoid exorbitant hotels bills.

A recent two-day, Washington conference on OSINT, organized by Eliot Jardines, assistant deputy director of national intelligence for open source, brought 1,200 people together from 40 countries. It was a mix of media, academia, business and the intelligence community.

All facets of OSINT were discussed, notably the constant drama of constant trivia that has afflicted U.S. media since the end of the Cold War (e.g., almost two years of O.J. Simpson that kept America's collective eye off the international ball; infamous skater Tonya Harding, who got more airtime in a comparable news period than the fall of the Berlin Wall that collapsed the Soviet empire; Rep. Gary Condit, whose affair with a murdered staffer was dislodged by Osama bin Laden and the September 11, 2001, terror attacks; Paris Hilton, whose mind-numbing, one-hour interview on "Larry King Live" reminded the millions who watched that addle-brained celebrity has now displaced merit-based fame).

For obvious reasons, open source information is no longer the traditional collection from open sources. This aspect of the intelligence business has become infinitely more complex. There are now 26,000 individual newspapers in the world that have to be monitored because one or two might contain a piece or two of a global terrorist puzzle. To complete the global Tower of Babel babble, there are 26,000 radio stations; 21,000 TV stations; 108 million Web sites; 75 million blogs; 56 million MySpace squatters; 100 million hits a day on YouTube; 8,000 news and information portals; 200 million photos on flickr.com, increasing by 5,000 per minute; 45,000 daily podcasts, and 2.5 million Web-enabled devices.

The pipe input into the Internet doubles every six months. Some 627 petabytes crisscross the globe daily on the Internet (one petabyte equals 1,024 terabytes, or 2 to the 50th power, which comes out to 1,125,899,906,842,624). That's several thousand times the entire contents of the Library of Congress — every day.

Cold War problems were a lead-pipe cinch next to today's counterterrorism challenges. As Tom Fingar, deputy director of national intelligence for analysis, said, "For almost half a century it was a question of what do we do to keep nations on our side and what we do to pry the others away." Now the intelligence community has 15 minutes to supply answers to immediate questions. Decisions will be made whether the intelligence community can weigh in or not. The magnitude of the challenge can be gauged by the inexperience of many analysts hired since the September 11 attacks. Half of some 45,000 analysts in 16 intelligence agencies (total personnel just under 100,000) have less than five years experience. They were part of the explosive growth of the intelligence community after September 11.

Now the intelligence community needs to tell its political masters something critically important they didn't know — a lot more than Googling a profile for a living, or checking a Wiki entry. OSINT supplies the deeper knowledge that provides real insight into why, for example, a 21-year-old French Muslim living in the Paris suburb of St. Denis, whose grandparents were born in Algeria, found his way to Iraq to fight Americans and returned to France to set up a terrorist cell. A French professor who specializes in Islam would have access to such a youngster now in prison in France, not the CIA station chief in Paris.

With OSINT, the intelligence community wants to make accessibility a normal way of doing business. Too many things are stamped Top Secret, Secret or Classified, that don't need to be. Even newspaper clippings sent from one Intel agency to another have wound up classified.

OSINT is now a matter of consulting the best experts available. A Cold War National Intelligence Estimate used to take 480 days to reach agreement among 16 agencies. It is now down to 80 days — still far too long, says Director of National Intelligence Adm. Mike McConnell.

As Mary Margaret Graham, deputy DNI for collection, says, "Open Source is a discipline of collection, not intelligence per se, but an enabler of intelligence." The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) where this reporter dwells as a senior adviser, has just published the findings of a one-year experiment in "Open Source as a Force Multiplier in Intelligence."

CSIS' Transnational Threats Project, which this writer directs, recruited 15 experts on Islamist extremism in Europe from the Middle East (including Israel), North Africa, Europe, the United States and Canada, and networked them 24/7 with a state-of-the-art, electronic collaborative software tool. They were known as TIN members — for Trusted Information Network.

With a budget of less than half a million dollars, Tom Sanderson, who moderated the TIN, and his deputy Jacqueline Harned, proved such a network can produce material inaccessible to the intelligence community. It can be used for myriad problems requiring expert illumination.

Commented Eliot Jardines, Open Source Director for the Intelligence Community, "Why collect clandestinely what we can get from Open Source?" Why indeed. When Mr. Jardines came aboard ODNI in 2005, with his deputy Sabra Horne, senior adviser for outreach, they had a blank slate. They then decided to gather Open Source expertise from academia, media, corporations, the IC, the military and government. The Washington Open Source conference more than met everyone's expectations.

Arnaud de Borchgrave is editor at large of The Washington Times and of United Press International.
Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

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Open Source Challenge

Mensaje por Loopster » 18 Sep 2008 19:19

¿Qué tal una competición sobre obtención y análisis a través de fuentes abiertas? Pues algo así se han montado los de la Oficina del Director Nacional de Inteligencia, una competición en la que hay que responder a una de estas dos preguntas:

Challenge Questions

1) Using the best open sources to inform your answer, is Al Qaeda a cohesive organization with strong and centralized control, intent and direction?


2) According to open sources, who will be the global leader in alternative fuels and why?



¿Hacer esto aquí? no por Diosssssssssssss, no sea que a algunos se le trastoquen los esquemas, esos que dicen que el OSINT es algo minoritario e inútil y que nadie sabía que eramos un objetivo claro en Líbano o que Sadr se armaba en nuestra cara en Iraq. ¡País!


http://www.dniopensource.org/Conference/Challenge.aspx
Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

KS

Mensaje por KS » 18 Sep 2008 22:47

Me parece una idea muy buena, sirve para calcular qué es lo que se puede deducir mediante fuentes abiertas, para fichar nuevo personal y colaboradores que han demostrado que son capaces de atar cabos.

Ojala se hiciese algo así por aquí.

KS

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Re: OSINT en el US Army

Mensaje por kilo009 » 18 Feb 2010 22:31

Open Source Intelligence (OSINT):
Issues for Congress
December 5, 2007

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Debate Centers on Relative Value Of Open Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Historically, Open Source Has Played a Secondary Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Open Source Information Defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Analysts Face Obstacles in Use of Open Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Intelligence Community Criticized For Not Making Greater Use of
Open Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Aspin-Brown Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
9/11 Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
WMD Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Congress Urges Creation of an Open Source Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Intelligence Community’s Response: the Open Source Enterprise . . . . . . . 11
National Open Source Center (NOSC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Use of Open Source in Government Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Department of Defense (DOD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Metrics for Open Source Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Congressional Oversight of Open Source: Potential Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Identifying Open Source Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Copyright Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Moving the NOSC from the CIA to the Office of the DNI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

http://www.brightplanet.com/images/uplo ... ngress.pdf


Y artículo relacionado con la materia en el blog de la empresa S21sec:

14 julio 2009OSINT ( Open Source Intelligence ) .

Open Source Intelligence ( OSINT de ahora en adelante ) es la disciplina encargada de la adquisición, tratamiento y posterior transformación en inteligencia de la información conseguida a partir de fuentes de carácter público como prensa, radio, televisión , internet, informes de diferentes sectores y en general cualquier recurso accesible públicamente.

Término utilizado ya en ámbitos militares/gubernamentales hace años, su origen “oficial” fue la creación en Estados Unidos de la Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) en el año 1941 como organismo recolector de inteligencia a partir del rastreo , traducción y análisis de transmisiones extranjeras relacionadas con la propaganda de guerra en diferentes zonas del mundo. Como dato anecdótico cabe destacar el primer informe que esta oficina emitió sobre la supuesta disposición por parte Tokio a entrar en conflicto (que coincidió con el ataque a Pearl Harbor el dia después).

Avanzado el conflicto, y como verdadero ejemplo de OSINT es curioso el indicador que este organismo utilizo para deducir el porcentaje de éxito de los ataques contra infraestructuras ferroviarias en la segunda guerra mundial: los precios de las naranjas en París. Es decir, se consiguió una inteligencia “utilizable” a partir de un dato público que no parecía poder aportar nada interesante a los analistas.

Después de varios cambios de rumbo en su historia, este proyecto culminó en el año 2005 con su absorción por el denominado Open Source Center, ente encargado de todo lo relacionado con OSINT en los USA actualmente.

Teniendo en cuenta informes como este ( 2006 ) y gracias a la evolución paralela de esta práctica a diferentes niveles ( académico, civil, empresarial ) alrededor del mundo, parece demostrada la eficacia de este tipo de adquisición de inteligencia , siendo su uso y gestión objeto de estudio y mejora constantes, formando parte de la metodología de captación y análisis de información de entes públicos y privados.

En el departamento de e-crime, conscientes de esta “cultura de la inteligencia” aplicamos a nuestro “terreno” esta práctica como complemento a otras metodologías con el objetivo de tener una mayor visión global del fenómeno.

En este sentido aprovecho para recordar la reciente creación del primer Intelligence Center a nivel nacional donde podréis encontrar algunos informes interesantes.

En posteriores posts profundizaremos más sobre OSINT aplicada al fraude, la diferencia con la investigación pura y dura , recursos interesantes a tener en cuenta y en general cualquier información que nos ayude a familiarizarnos con este concepto.

Daniel L. Creus
S21sec e-crime http://blog.s21sec.com/2009/07/osint-op ... gence.html


Por último un pdf (copiando un Powert Point) muy resumido que explica las capacidades del OSINT de una forma muy simple y orientativa:

http://www.luisdesalvador.com/JornadaCiber2/OSINT.pdf
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Re: OSINT en el US Army

Mensaje por Alí Bei » 18 Feb 2010 22:50

¡Muchas gracias, kilo009!

¡Siempre aportando información interesante al foro! 8)
"En la era de la información todo el mundo sabe qué es lo que está pasando, pero muy pocos entienden lo que significa." (Sanz Roldán, en una de sus conferencias)

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Re: Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Mensaje por kilo009 » 28 Abr 2011 16:38

Añado otro:

Sailing the Sea of OSINT in the Information Age

https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for- ... cle05.html

A Venerable Source in a New Era

Stephen C. Mercado
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Re: Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Mensaje por Alí Bei » 28 Abr 2011 20:55

¡Gracias, de nuevo, kilo009!
"En la era de la información todo el mundo sabe qué es lo que está pasando, pero muy pocos entienden lo que significa." (Sanz Roldán, en una de sus conferencias)

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Curso Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)

Mensaje por Jose Luis Mansilla » 25 Jul 2011 14:11

Hola a todos, os dejo información de este cursillo de Open Source Intelligence , que van a hacer en Cambrige icc-ccs.

Tiene buena pinta , menos el precio.

http://www.icc-ccs.org/courses-training ... nce-course

How to use the Internet as an Effective Investigative Research Tool: Three-day course at Cambridge University 18-21 September 2011.
Internet Intelligence Course £ 2460,00 Unlimited

Course Overview
ICC Commercial Crime Services have developed a three-day course to be held in state of the art computer facilities at Cambridge University which will provide delegates with:
 An overview of the Internet and how it works
 The ability to use the Internet in a more effective way as an open source/competitive intelligence tool
 Advanced techniques to mine data using different search tools and uncover hidden information
 Strategies for filtering, analysing and organising research data
 An awareness of security and privacy issues including techniques to both hide and increase visibilities of sites
The course will be highly practical and interactive and is led by David Toddington, who is a leading expert with a wealth of experience in this field. Each delegate will receive a 250-page comprehensive manual, as well as various shareware software applications, and a certificate of attendance.
Course syllabus
Topics covered in the course include:
 Open Sources Intelligence (OSINT)
 Web 2.0 and ‘user generated content’
 Search Engine Mechanics
 Hypertext Markup Language Basics
 Meta” and “Mega” Search Tools
 Public Directories, Specialised Databases & Desktop Search Tools
 SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) - Common Internet Marketing Practices
 Downloading and Archiving Internet Sourced Materials
 Mapping and Automatically Monitoring Websites of Special Interest
 Determining the Geographic and Physical Location of Websites and Internet Users
 Maintaining Security and Protecting Privacy in the Networked World
 Advanced Forum and Newsgroup Searching Techniques
 Maintaining Anonymity Online - How and When to Protect Your Online Identity
 Making Sense of the Data - Introduction to the Intelligence Analysis Process
 Using Blog, Wiki and Social Networking sites as tactical intelligence tools
 Using RSS Feeds and News Aggregators


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