Yihadismo en Europa - Tema General

Subforo para recoger las noticias relacionadas con las redes terroristas en Europa y sus conexiones exteriores
Avatar de Usuario
Esteban
Jefe de Operaciones
Jefe de Operaciones
Mensajes: 2154
Registrado: Mié Ene 10, 2007 6:38 pm

Yihadismo en Europa - Tema General

Mensaje por Esteban » Sab May 26, 2007 9:41 pm

Hay un trabajo que sigue la metodología de Sageman y que analiza el panorama de las redes yihadistas en Europa. Lo firma el especialista holandés Edwin Bakker

Jihadi terrorists in Europe, their characteristics and the circumstances in which they joined the jihad: an exploratory study,
Edwin Bakker

Much has been published about Islamist or jihadi terrorism in recent years. In particular the Al-Qaeda network has been studied in detail. Less attention has been given to specific characteristics of jihadi terrorists and the circumstances in which they joined the violent jihad.

The latest Clingendael Security Paper, 'Jihadi terrorists in Europe', aims to contribute to a better understanding of the individuals and networks that have been behind jihadi terrorist activities in Europe (31 foiled and 'successful' plots and attacks between September 2001 and September 2006). To this end, it identifies about 250 terrorists and their networks, and investigates their characteristics and the circumstances under which they joined the violent jihad.

The study builds upon the work of Marc Sageman - 'Understanding terror networks', University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004. In his research, Sageman investigated the biographies of 172 individuals involved in the global Salafi network in the 1990s and the years until 2003, when the role of the central staff of Al-Qaeda was still very strong.

Partly as a result of the global fight against terrorism, the shape and nature of jihadi terrorism has changed. The investigations into the Madrid, Amsterdam and London attacks did not show a clear link with Al-Qaeda. The same holds for most of the recently discovered plots and failed attacks in Europe. Many jihadi terrorists in Europe appear to have turned into 'self-organised' and 'self-recognised' groups.

These new developments call for specific questions regarding present-day jihadi terrorists in Europe: are these groups and individuals very different from global Salafi terrorists; or are the circumstances in which they joined the jihad fundamentally different from those in which these Salafis joined this fight?

Based on Sageman's methodology, the Clingendael study examines individuals and networks involved in jihadi terrorist activities in Europe since 2001. Next, the characteristics of these European jihadi terrorists are compared with those of the sample of Sageman's 172 global Salafi terrorists.

The study concludes that most of the networks differ in size, target selection, geographical background, and other variables. However, within networks there is homogeneity. Members of the network often are about the same age and come from the same places. This may be explained by the way these networks are formed, which often is through social affiliation. Many consist of people that are related to each other through kinship or friendship.

The analysis of the characteristics of the 242 individual jihadi terrorists leads to the following general picture. They are mostly single males that are born and raised in Europe; they are not particularly young; they are often from the lower strata of society; and many of them have a criminal record. Given the fact that more than 40 percent of them were born in Europe and an additional 55 percent have been raised in European countries or are long-term residents, the label 'home-grown' is very appropriate to this group.

If we look at the circumstances in which these individuals became involved in jihadi terrorist activities, a picture emerges of networks including friends or relatives that do not seem to have formal ties with global Salafi networks; that radicalise with little outside interference; and that do so in the country in which they live, often together with family members or friends.

Comparing the sample of the European group with that of Sageman's 172 members of global Salafi networks leads to the conclusion that European jihadi terrorists are rather different from Sageman's global Salafi terrorists. This holds in particular for age, family status, and socioeconomic and geographic background. However, the circumstances in which these global Salafi terrorists joined the jihad are not fundamentally unlike those in which the jihadi terrorist in Europe joined the terrorist struggle to further Islamist ideology. In both cases social affiliation plays an important role in joining the jihad.

More information
More information through the CSCP secretariat of the Clingendael Institute. Tel. 070 - 3746654, email: [email protected].
La necesidad permite lo prohibido.

Avatar de Usuario
Esteban
Jefe de Operaciones
Jefe de Operaciones
Mensajes: 2154
Registrado: Mié Ene 10, 2007 6:38 pm

Mensaje por Esteban » Sab May 26, 2007 10:14 pm

Según el comentario que sobre el trabajo anterior hace el SoFIR, de los 242 terroristas del trabajo, su distribución por pasaporte es la siguiente:

Imagen

Moroccans include individuals with dual citizenship in Morocco and Netherlands, Belgium or Spain.

Algerians include individuals with dual citizenship in Algeria and France or Spain.

Britons include individuals with dual citizenship in the UK and Pakistan, Ethiopia, Egypt, Eritrea, Ghana, India, Jamaica or Malawi. Note that of 44 individuals holding British citizenship 20 held dual citizenship.

Moroccan, Algerian and British citizens account for 51.79% of the jihadis in the study. The Moroccans and Algerians were all ethnic Maghrebis, while of the 24 who were solely citizens of the United Kingdom 2 were ethnic Britons, while the remaining 22 were from immigrant families.

The French include individuals with dual citizenship in France and Algeria.

Pakistanis include individuals with dual citizenship in Pakistan and the UK or Canada.

Belgians include individuals with dual citizenship in Belgium and Morocco or Tunisia.

Spaniards include individuals with dual citizenship in Spain and Algeria, Syria or Morocco.

The Dutch include individuals with dual citizenship in the Netherlands and Morocco or the USA.

And the Palestinians include individuals with Jordanian citizenship.
La necesidad permite lo prohibido.

Avatar de Usuario
Esteban
Jefe de Operaciones
Jefe de Operaciones
Mensajes: 2154
Registrado: Mié Ene 10, 2007 6:38 pm

Mensaje por Esteban » Sab May 26, 2007 10:17 pm

Imagen
jihadis appear to be linked by family or citizenship to just a handful of Muslim-majority countries and/or they are residents of European countries known to harbor relatively large populations of immigrants or refugees from those Muslim-majority countries. The following was first presented in a restricted-access report we released earlier this


Cruzando los datos con las IPs de origen de internautas que solían visitar un foro yihadista, sale algo en consonancia con lo anterior:

Imagen

[quote]Of the Muslim majority countries, five - Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Algeria and Syria - have their own traditions of Islamic radicalism and/or political violence, and the governments of each have reputations for being aggressive in their efforts to root out Islamic extremists, producing as a consequence an outflow of refugees and political asylum seekers.

Conclusion

In light of the above, I would like to offer up the following for future discussion and research:

• Most Islamic extremists are either in countries with Muslim majorities, or they are immigrants from such countries or the descendants of immigrants from such countries.

The failure to assimilate or integrate Muslim minorities into non-Muslim societies fails to adequately explain Muslim radicalization because the vast majority of jihadists continue to hail from Muslim-majority countries.

Liberal immigration policies and asylum-granting procedures, together with a kind of multiculturalism that actively undermines the ethnic and cultural identities of Europeans, have on the other hand created a situation where a number of European countries are now home to Muslim immigrants and their offspring who are disproportionately from countries with traditions of Islamic fundamentalism, Islamic radicalism and/or political violence.

• Islamic radicalization is at least in part driven by a quest for an authentic Muslim experience, such that when second or even third generation Muslims are in the process of radicalizing themselves, they naturally turn towards their ancestral homes and to the traditions of radical or fundamentalist Islam found in those countries. In this regard multiculturalism is likely a contributing factor, both in terms of legitimizing and enabling those radical traditions, and in propelling European converts to Islam to adopt increasingly fundamentalist and violent forms of that faith.[/quote]
La necesidad permite lo prohibido.

Avatar de Usuario
Esteban
Jefe de Operaciones
Jefe de Operaciones
Mensajes: 2154
Registrado: Mié Ene 10, 2007 6:38 pm

Mensaje por Esteban » Jue Ago 16, 2007 7:13 pm

Dos nuevos trabajos de la Fundación Jamestown. Como es habitual, muy recomendables.

An Inside Look at France's Mosque Surveillance Program
By Pascale Combelles Siegel

http://www.jamestown.org/terrorism/news ... id=2373621

Italy's Underground Islamist Network
By Kathryn Haahr

http://www.jamestown.org/terrorism/news ... id=2373623
La necesidad permite lo prohibido.

Mod. 3
Oficial de Enlace
Oficial de Enlace
Mensajes: 95
Registrado: Vie Ene 12, 2007 6:38 pm

Mensaje por Mod. 3 » Vie Sep 14, 2007 8:34 pm

Movido por la moderación para mantener los temas agrupados de forma homogénea.

Gracias.


ZULU escribió:
La derecha liberal y social holandesa coinciden en alertar sobre la incompatibilidad del islam con la democracia

Sigue el debate en Holanda sobre el islam, con el telón de fondo de la polémica sobre los inmigrantes musulmanes, que muchos consideran incapaces de integrarse en Europa. El tema de la integración de inmigrantes es un asunto candente en Holanda, país donde ese grupo de población registra altos porcentajes de paro. Además, la mayoría de los extranjeros que tiene trabajo realiza tareas que requieren poca escolarización, y percibe salarios muy bajos.

Tras el asesinato de Theo van Gogh y las amenazas de muerte a la diputada liberal holandesa de origen somalí, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, por sus críticas al islam, el problema se ha trasladado a la opinión pública hasta el punto de causar un terremoto en el panorama electoral y político holandés.

En las últimas elecciones el Partido por la Libertad, ha conseguido 9 escaños de los 150 con que cuenta el parlamento holandés. Su líder Geert Wilders, adquirió relevancia internacional por un artículo publicado en el diario Volkskrant titulado “Ya es suficiente: prohibid el Corán”. Wilders traza un paralelismo entre el libro sagrado de los musulmanes y el “Mein Kampf” (”Mi Lucha”) en el que Adolf Hitler expuso sus ideas nacionalsocialistas. La legislación holandesa penaliza la comercialización del libro de Hitler, aunque su posesión no está prohibida.
En opinión del parlamentario de la derecha social, “el Corán debería ser también proscrito, pues varias de sus suras ordenan a los fieles que maten a judíos, cristianos y no creyentes, violen a sus mujeres e impongan un estado totalitario musulmán”. El artículo tuvo su inspiración en la agresión sufrida el pasado sábado por Ehsan Jami, joven concejal de un suburbio cercano a La Haya que dirige un comité de apoyo para apostatas musulmanes.

Por su parte los liberales del Partido Popular por la Libertad y la Democracia (en neerlandés: Volkspartij voor Vrijheid en Democratie, VVD), que han formado parte de la coalición de gobierno desde 1994 hasta 2006, impulsaron en su día a través de la ex ministra Verdonk, actual representante del Partido Liberal en la Cámara Baja holandesa, un programa de integración para los inmigrantes en el que se obligaba a los mismos a aprender el idioma holandés y costear en parte los cursos, ya que muchos de esos inmigrantes, después de permanecer incluso 12 o 20 años en Holanda, no hablan el holandés. Pero las diferencias del VVD, partido al que pertenecía Ayaan Hirsi Ali, con los democristianos del CDA, sobre la conveniencia de realizar expulsiones masivas de ilegales han sido constantes y han servido de telón de fondo a la crisis de la coalición de gobierno de centro derecha.

Tras las elecciones de 2006 el VVD ha pasado a la oposición, y en la nueva coalición de gobierno ha entrado el socialdemócrata PvdA, partido que pese a sufrir una importante debacle electoral –paso de 42 a 32 escaños- aboga por una política de entendimiento con lo que denominan el Islam liberal y por exigir la regularización de los ilegales que viven desde hace años en el país.

Precisamente al este respecto, la semana pasada, Geert Wilders, el polémico líder del Partido por la Libertad, y varios críticos del islam dentro de las filas del liberal VVD, afirmaron que un islam “puro” contraviene los principios de la democracia y los derechos humanos. Además estos políticos pusieron en duda que un islam moderado o presuntamente liberal exista realmente más allá de las alianzas de conveniencia entre EE.UU. y las petromonarquias, o la imaginación del multiculturalismo.

También ambos partidos han entrado en polémica con los democristianos y socialistas por el nombramiento de dos viceministros con nacionalidad marroquí y turca respectivamente, además de la holandesa, al considerar que puede plantearse una incompatibilidad de funciones.

Los partidos de la oposición VVD y PVV quieren debatir sobre este tema con el primer ministro, Jan Peter Balkenende, y el ministro de Relaciones Exteriores, Maxime Verhagen, especialmente en relación con la diputada Khadija Arib, marroquí de origen, que es a la vez asesora del rey Mohammed VI. Ellos opinan que la función de asesora de Arib es incompatible con su función de parlamentaria, porque podría ocasionar un conflicto de lealtades. Por el contrario para los socialistas del PvdA, puede seguir desempeñando ambos cargos.

kilo009
Administrador
Mensajes: 7691
Registrado: Lun Nov 13, 2006 10:29 pm
Ubicación: Foro de Inteligencia
Contactar:

Mensaje por kilo009 » Sab Dic 01, 2007 1:20 pm

Este tipo, Kamel Abbachi, fue detenido el miércoles en Bucarest:

-Es argelino
-La operación es conjunta entre los SS de Italia, Suiza y Rumaia.
-Reclutaba miembros para la yihad
-Era líder de una célula de Al-Qaeda en Europa del Este.
Saber para Vencer

Twitter

Facebook

Morgan

Artefactos Yihadistas

Mensaje por Morgan » Lun Mar 31, 2008 4:55 pm

¿hay algún documento o web que haya hecho un estudio sobre la manera de construir artefactos por parte de esta gente? (explosivos, iniciadores, seguros de transporte, etc, etc....

Yo he buscado pero no encuentro nada excepto un informe que presentó CityFM (no recuerdo bien si era parte de un libro que escribieron a medias un ex-edex y alguien de CityFM.)

gracias.

Morgan

Mensaje por Morgan » Jue Abr 03, 2008 10:13 am

Solucionado. Más o menos.

cartledge
Jefe de Operaciones
Jefe de Operaciones
Mensajes: 1567
Registrado: Vie May 11, 2007 12:45 am

Mensaje por cartledge » Vie Abr 11, 2008 5:01 pm

En www.athenaintelligence.org publican un nuevo artículo sobre la situación del terrorismo en la unión Europea

cartledge
Jefe de Operaciones
Jefe de Operaciones
Mensajes: 1567
Registrado: Vie May 11, 2007 12:45 am

Mensaje por cartledge » Vie Abr 11, 2008 5:06 pm

Se me olvidaba apuntar que el informe es de EUROPOL

Responder

Volver a “Yihadismo en Europa”