Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

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Jose Luis Mansilla
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por Jose Luis Mansilla »

Blackjack , me gustaria que me oyese Zapatero , le llamaria de sensible para arriba.
Pero que fuese igual de humano con la gente que le estan quitando las casas los piratas con corbata.
Un saludo,

bladerunner
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por bladerunner »

Si como dice "Lopsteer" hubieran incentivos por piratas neutralizados...seguro que los sueldos se dispararían :lol: :lol:

maxbs
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por maxbs »

bladerunner escribió:Si como dice "Lopsteer" hubieran incentivos por piratas neutralizados...seguro que los sueldos se dispararían :lol: :lol:


Que yo sepa, solo se dispara al aire para que se den media vuelta. Al menos eso es lo que cuentan los periolistos......

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Jose Luis Mansilla
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por Jose Luis Mansilla »

Segun de que paises .La mayoria los manda al "Mas allá"

maxbs
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por maxbs »

Seguramente me he olvidado de poner algun emoticono con alguna risita. Lo que si recuerdo de la ministra es que dijo que las instrucciones que tenian los vigilantes eran las de "asustar" a los flacuchos y solo usar fuerza letal en ultimo recurso......... Locu&l esta bien y mas aun en ese mismo orden.

yosida
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por yosida »

Maritime Security: Germany Authorizes Their Ships To Use Private Armed Security

This is good news for German private security companies and German shipping. With the blessing of their government, now they have a means of securing PSC’s to legally protect their country’s ships. The German shipping market is big as well, so this should lead to an increase of contracts for PSC’s in this market.

I also like the quote about the monopoly of the use of force. All I can say is Max Weber is rolling in his grave right now! lol

The government had until now always rejected such a solution, unwilling to give up the state’s monopoly on the use of legitimate force.

But seriously, this was the right move. If the state cannot provide that protection because of other commitments or a lack of government funding, then of course allowing private industry to contract with PSC’s is the next best thing. The shipping companies can also choose the best company that meets their needs.

The other interesting quote was the study that was done on how many shipping companies had already contracted armed security:

Shipping firms have started taking matters into their own hands, with a study published last week by the consultancy firm PwC showing 27 German ships already carry armed security men on board, with a further six employing unarmed security operatives. Just 17 percent of the 100 firms questioned said they thought the ‘Atalanta’ mission added to safety in the pirate regions.
The Association of German Ship Owners (VDR) confirmed the move towards employing armed guards, but said it was only a second-best solution.

If just 27 ships out of this survey group of 100 have armed security, and that only 17 % thought the Atalanta task force mission of protection was successful, then do the math? Not to mention an increase of attacks on German boats. The German PSC market should see pretty drastic growth now that the government is blessing this, and those companies positioned to be first movers on this market will do well. Did I mention that German ship owners control 3,500 ships, the world’s third largest fleet? Interesting stuff. -Matt

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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por Loopster »

America's Losing Pirate Battle escribió:Is the Libyan war claiming casualties as far away as the Indian Ocean, the Arabian Sea, and the Gulf of Aden? That is the implication of this week’s report from the International Maritime Organization, which says attacks on shipping by Somali pirates in those waters hit a record in the first half of 2011. Requests to NATO for more ships to patrol sea lanes have been denied. Why? The Western navies are too busy in Libya.

Two years ago, amid a great burst of media attention, the U.S. and the EU committed ships and aircraft to battle the pirates. In April 2009, President Obama drew widespread and justified praise when he ordered a military operation that resulted in the rescue of a hostage sea captain and the killing of three Somali pirates with three bullets. The president promised to “halt the rise of piracy” in the region. French President Nicolas Sarkozy made a similar vow the previous year, after his nation’s special forces freed a pair of hostages.

Since then, the world’s attention has moved on. Although the piracy problem largely dropped off television screens, it is growing worse. Not only are the rates of attack rising, but so are the ransoms. Indeed, piracy is one of the world’s fastest-growing businesses. A recent report from the consulting firm Geopoliticity calculates that the average ransom for a hijacked ship, which ran about $150,000 as recently as 2005, now exceeds $5 million, meaning that pirates are earning well over $200 million a year. The income of a Somali pirate, says the report, can easily exceed 100 times what he could earn from legitimate work in his country.

The most powerful pirate group, known as the Somali Marines, is so sophisticated, says GlobalSecurity.org, that it “has a military structure, with a fleet admiral, admiral, vice admiral and a head of financial operations.” The gang carries out more than 80 percent of the hijackings in the region, and evidently pioneered the “mothership” attack model, using a large boat to get small, fast skiffs into deep water. (The Somali Marines who are pirates should not be confused with the Somali Marines who are soldiers—and who freely admit that they cannot defend the coastline against the pirates.)

The annual costs of piracy to world shipping, including damage and delay, are difficult to measure, but most experts agree that the figure is in the vicinity of $10 billion; some say more. The Geopolicity report estimates annual losses in the $13 billion to $15 billion range by 2014. And unless the pirates are defeated, the cost is likely to keep rising. The practice is so lucrative, and so weakly policed, that there is little incentive for the pirates to stop.

Despite all the promises, there is, at the moment, little the West can do. Its forces are overextended. A traditional and often overlooked function of the military is to keep the sea lanes open. In recent decades, this responsibility has fallen largely on the United States Navy, the dominant power in the world.

This is one reason that President Obama’s plan to save money by greatly reducing the size of the Pentagon’s budget may prove shortsighted. Defense spending should not be off-limits when the entire country is struggling. But the $400 billion in cuts announced so far, combined with an additional $400 billion to $500 billion that the administration is said to be seeking, is far too high. The dividend from ending the Iraq War and drawing down forces in Afghanistan cannot explain the entire reduction. Much of the money is going to come from procurement, already strained under the Bush administration, which in effect cashed in modernization programs to get war funding.

“ Unless the pirates are defeated, the cost is likely to keep rising. The practice is so lucrative, and so weakly policed, that there is little incentive for the pirates to stop. ”

Cutting the Navy will have particularly far-reaching effects. It is the Navy that polices the sea lanes: for example, battling pirates. The naval surface fleet is built around the carrier strike group, consisting of an aircraft carrier and its escort ships. By maintaining a large number of these CSGs, as they are known, the United States is able to do what no other nation can: Project power, on short notice, anywhere in the world.

With the expected retirement of the USS Enterprise next year, however, the U.S. will have only 10 active-duty aircraft carriers, one less than the 11 mandated by federal law, and the smallest number since early in the Second World War. This is not entirely the fault of the administration: Congress has required that 11 carriers be maintained but has not provided the funds to support them.

In 2015, the first of the new Ford-class carriers is scheduled to enter service; the next is due in 2020. But these will likely replace, not augment, the carriers now in service. Moreover, because of maintenance and refitting requirements, the practical number of carriers deployable at any moment will be, most likely, six—an awfully small number to guard an awful lot of ocean. At the moment, only five American carriers are out of port. One of them, the Ronald Reagan, is reportedly in the Arabian Sea, but it is not there to battle pirates. It is supporting Operation Enduring Freedom—that is, the Afghan War.

Budgetary constraints have placed the Navy under increasing stress. According to Jane’s Defense Weekly, the Navy is cannibalizing its own ships in order to meet inspection requirements—that is, taking equipment from ship A (in active service) to bring ship B (also in active service) up to standard. Other reports say that as many as 20 percent of America’s naval vessels are failing combat-readiness inspections. Half of the Navy’s air fleet is in disrepair. One cause is said to be shrinking naval manpower: It is difficult to do the same amount of maintenance on a ship with a smaller crew.

Maybe Muammar Gaddafi will fall soon, and the West will have ships to spare to battle the Somali Marines and the other gangs. But we should bear in mind that what the pirates are doing is neither new nor unusual. All through history, wars have been fought for control of the sea lanes. The goal of America’s first naval war, against the Barbary States of northern Africa during the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, was precisely to protect shipping. Even if the Somali pirates are defeated, new maritime threats will arise.

Like it or not, for more than six decades the world has looked to the U.S. to keep the sea lanes open, a task, as Navy Secretary James Forrestal put it 1947, “more or less inherited from Britain” following World War II. Keeping the sea lanes open keeps world trade flowing. The job is indispensable, and nobody else can do it. In a perfect world, an international flotilla might patrol the seas, but the world is not perfect, and only the U.S. is in a position to take on the responsibility. It may even be, in a moral sense, our duty as the only superpower.

Thus a stark choice is upon us: We can spend what is necessary to defend the seas, or we can leave them undefended.
Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

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Loopster
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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por Loopster »

¿Recordáis a los "expertos" nacionales diciendo hace un par de años que los piratas no maltrataban a los rehenes y que no había muertos entre ellos?...


Piracy related torture is on the rise escribió:A new trend is making the rising incidence of piracy in the waters off Somalia even more disturbing.

It is not just that the pirates’ reach is increasing, there is also evidence that torture of captured seafarers is becoming a regular occurrence.

Bill Box of Intertanko is secretary of the industry’s SOS SaveOurSeafarers campaign. He told MJ, “A year or so ago the hostages were well treated, at least physically, although it was still tough mentally. But over the last 12 months we have seen a decline in the way hostages are treated on an ongoing basis. There is more incidence of torture now, and there are more deaths.”

Mr Box pointed to one ship, held for eight months. “Four months in, it seems the pirates got bored waiting for negotiations to finish, and started torturing the hostage seafarers on an almost daily basis.” One difficulty is that negotiations are protracted on both sides because logically, if ransom payments were agreed straight away, the amounts would simply become stratospheric.”

Mr Box’s point is that the political will being shown by governments is the only effective way to tackle piracy, but the political will only follows from people’s readiness to tell their governments to act. “This is the whole point behind the shipping industry’s SOS SaveOurSeafarers campaign”, he said.

Pottengal Mukundan, director of the International Maritime Bureau's piracy reporting centre said that more than 80% of captured pirates are freed, sending the wrong signal to the pirates.

As many as 62 seafarers have died in the past four years as a direct result of piracy in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean, through deliberate murder by pirates, suicide during the period of captivity, death from malnutrition and disease, death by drowning, or heart failure just after the hijacking. This year, despite the current monsoon season which normally reduces activity, Somali pirates have escalated their attacks.
Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

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Jose Luis Mansilla
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SEGURIDAD MARITIMA-Benin

Mensaje por Jose Luis Mansilla »

Hola a todos , en Benin se apuntan al negocio de la pirateria.
Extraido de International Chamber of Commerce.

ICC. Commercial Crime Services.

http://www.icc-ccs.org/news/447-imb-iss ... -for-benin

IMB issues piracy warning for Benin
Friday, 17 June 2011 15:00
The ICC International Maritime Bureau’s (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre (PRC) has issued a warning to vessels in the waters off Benin.

There have been eight attacks in total off Cotonou, Benin, so far in 2011 with six taking place since May this year. Of the eight attacks, four vessels were hijacked and two boarded by pirates who robbed ship and crew property and in some cases cargo.

The most recent attack took place on a Greek-owned tanker on 16 June 2011.

On 14 June 2011, heavily-armed pirates hijacked another Greek tanker as it lay off Cotonou. It was forced to sail to an unknown location and ship’s and crew property was stolen before she was abandoned.

IMB-PRC Manager Noel Choong commented: “The most recent attack was the eighth we have seen in recent weeks. Attacks are increasing off Cotonou and the pirates are violent, often injuring crewmembers. It is important that local authorities step up patrols to curb this problem."

Worldwide, there have been 248 attacks so far in 2011 with 28 vessels hijacked. The waters off Somalia continues to remain the most piracy-prone area but the risk to crews and shipping off Nigeria and its neighbouring states remains high as well. Especially since incidents are not reported.

Mr Choong continued: “These attacks off West Africa are worrying because they seem to involve a greater degree of violence against crew than other hijackings or robberies. We also know there is a problem with underreporting in this region, as owners and crews that regularly operate there may fear reprisals from the pirate gangs that inhabit the area.”

IMB strongly urges all shipmasters and owners to continue to report all worldwide actual, attempted or suspicious piracy and armed robbery incidents to the IMB’s Piracy Reporting Centre.

IMB Piracy Reporting Centre can be contacted:

PO Box 12559,
Kuala Lumpur,
50782,
Malaysia.


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Re: Información Sobre: SEGURIDAD MARITIMA

Mensaje por kilo009 »

Análisis de situación de la piratería en el Golfo de Guinea:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/ ... 5Z20110729
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