¡10.000 Ugandeses! Amenazas y oportunidades

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¡10.000 Ugandeses! Amenazas y oportunidades

Mensaje por Choco » Jue Mar 25, 2010 2:01 pm

Gracias a nuestro "Jefe De Operaciones", Loopster, sabiamos de la presencia, buen nivel de entrenamiento y experiencia de los contratistas ugandeses. Lo que al menos yo no sabía era ¡la cantidad!

Fuente: The Christian Science Monitor http://www.csmonitor.com/layout/set/print/content/view/print/243159

Los subrayados son mios

Max Delany, Contributor to The Christian Science Monitor escribió:
Why 10,000 :shock: :shock: :shock: Ugandans are eagerly serving in Iraq

Kampala, Uganda —

Under a relentless equatorial sun and the gaze of her Zimbabwean instructor, Juliet Kituye quickly reassembles her AK-47. Next to her, a young man in a ripped red T-shirt discharges imaginary rounds at an invisible target.

On a disused soccer pitch in the suburbs of the Ugandan capital, Kampala, 300 hopefuls are being put through rudimentary firearms training. Many of the recruits are raw and their drills occasionally lurch towards slapstick. One trainee lets the magazine slip out of his automatic rifle and onto the red earth, someone else about turns right instead of left. All of them share the same dream, however: going to Iraq.

As President Barack Obama announces plans to withdraw US troops from Iraq, thousands of young Ugandans are increasingly desperate to be sent to the war-torn country. Already, the Ugandan government says there are more than 10,000 men and women from this poverty-stricken East African nation working as private security guards in Iraq. Hired out to multibillion-dollar companies for hundreds of dollars a month, they risk their lives seeking fortunes protecting US Army bases, airports, and oil firms.

The war in Iraq is the most privatized conflict in history. Since the invasion in 2003, the US Department of Defense has doled out contracts worth an estimated $100 billion to private firms. Covering a vast range of services from catering to dry cleaning to security, one in every five dollars the US spends in Iraq ends up in the pockets of the contractors, according to a report by the Congressional Budget Office. Increasingly these jobs have been outsourced to developing countries.

It is clear why the US contractors came to Uganda
. As an impoverished former British colony, the country is awash with unemployed and English-speaking potential recruits. Its pliant government was an early member of President Bush's "coalition of the willing," and with a lingering 20-year insurgency, it also has a glut of experienced army veterans (¿Seguro que sólo es por eso?), who made up the initial contingent of Ugandans in Iraq.

More important, hiring Ugandans is cheap. Since the first Ugandans were sent to Iraq in late 2005, competition from other developing countries in Africa and the Indian subcontinent has seen the government cut the minimum wage from $1,300 to $600 a month. That compares with the $15,000 that one industry insider estimated an American guard could make each month. Nevertheless, competition is fierce, and for those Ugandans who land a job, Iraq can prove a bonanza.

Paul Mugabe is back in Uganda for a month. For the past year, the sinewy, nervous young man has been guarding the American Camp Diamondback at the airport in the northern Iraqi town of Mosul, and soon he will be heading to Baghdad.

"It's not like Uganda. You sweat and sweat and sweat," says Mr. Mugabe, a former soldier in the Ugandan Army. "It is the most dangerous place in the world. It's even worse than Congo."

With the money he's earned during those 12 months, back in his village Mugabe has built himself two houses, bought a bar, and increased the herd of cows his father left him to 30.

"You should see the size of my banana plantation," he smiles. When he returns from another year in Iraq, he should have saved enough money to cover a wedding and the traditional bride price needed to find a pretty wife, he says.

But despite his nascent business empire and hopes of love, the fact that he is putting his life on the line to help US companies make massive profits is not lost on him. "If I am earning $600 a month and these companies are making billions, it is not fair," he says.

For Uganda, however, another country's war on a continent far away has proved to be lucrative. "The Iraq opportunity brings in about $90 million dollars, whereas our chief export, which is coffee, brings in around $60 or $70 million a year," says the former state minister for labor, employment, and industrial relations, Mwesigwa Rukutana, now minister of higher education. That figure is mostly made up of remittances.

But domestic criticism has been fierce, with some equating the system to human trafficking or slavery. Reports of abuse, ranging from poor conditions and changeable contracts to sexual assault, have appeared in the media.

"Unlike in the past when there was the slave trade, no company comes here and recruits anyone against their wishes. It is willing worker, willing employer," Mr. Rukutana says. "If anyone thinks the conditions there are bad or that he is going to be exploited, no one is compelling him to go." Rukutana says that only one Ugandan has been killed in Iraq, while others say more have died.

If anyone understands some of the hardships of working in Iraq and the industry it's spawned, then it is Moses Matsiko. Mr. Matsiko has spent nearly four years working for a US firm in Afghanistan and Iraq. In late 2006, a convoy he was escorting through the town of Fallujah was ambushed. He was shot seven times but survived. Two American colleagues he was with were killed.

But far from shy away from the dangers of Iraq, Matsiko has embraced its opportunities. In 2007, he started his own company to train and send guards to Iraq and now has over 1,200 in the country.

"My experience in Iraq is that despite having been shot seven times, it is very great," (No me jodais, tiene pelotas el tio) he says. President Obama's withdrawal plans have cast a shadow of doubt over his future business plans. But that has just forced Matsiko to start looking opportunities elsewhere.

"If all goes well, then I hope to be sending people to Afghanistan in the near future," he smiles.


Y me pregunto yo ¿Tiene AFRICOM algo que ver con esto?. O independientemente de ello ¿Está en sus planes usar esta fuerza?. Espero que si. 10.000 muy preparados y aguerridos soldados negros, leales a sus "Team Leaders" son una fuerza mercenaria digna de los grandes imperios de la historia. Y el este de África siempre ha estado hecho una mierda, pero va cada vez peor. Crece el islamismo, el extremismo cristiano en la propia Uganda, Dafúr y la alianza Chino-Sudanesa...

Pero tambien por el petróleo y el gas, con nuevos yacimientos en la propia Uganda,Tanzania y Mozambique y exploraciones en marcha en Etiopía ¡y en la propia Somalia!.

Por otra parte, si el tema se maneja mal, cuando se seque mercado Iraquí correriamos el riesgo se acabar en una situación parecida a la de los sudafricanos en los 90s. Los líos de EO y tal.

¿Que pensais?

Un saludo
"Cuatro periódicos hostiles son mas temibles que mil bayonetas" - Napoleón Bonaparte

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Re: ¡10.000 Ugandeses! Amenazas y oportunidades

Mensaje por blackjack » Jue Mar 25, 2010 3:23 pm

Pues si no me equivoco hay intenciones de cerrarles el grifo.
Creo que se comentó en el foro que Uganda tenía intención de crear unas leyes similares a las de Sudáfrica para evitar el mercenariazgo.

Luego que eso se haga efectivo o no es otra historia.

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Re: ¡10.000 Ugandeses! Amenazas y oportunidades

Mensaje por Loopster » Jue Mar 25, 2010 5:11 pm

Eso que comentáis es al mismo tiempo lo que buscaba el DoD (y seguro que AFRICOM tuvo algo que ver) y la mayor pesadilla del DoS.

Efectivamente, 10.000 ugandeses, como mínimo, han recibido formación por parte de PMCs estadounidenses y han trabajado como seguridad de bases, en control de accesos... pero también han formado los Rapid Response Team y los Designated Marksmen Team que actuaban en VBC, LSA Anaconda y otras bases.

¿Por qué lo buscaba el DoD? porque ahora tienen 10.000 africanos, que hablan inglés, poco sospechosos de ser islamistas, acostumbrados a trabajar con el US Army y el USMC, entrenados con la metodología estadounidense y con armas tanto modernas (M9, M4, M16, M240, M2... SR25) como con las tipicas que se encuentran en África (AK, AKM, RPK, PKM, RPG,...). Cuando haya un follón en África y se mande a la Unión Africana, ¿quienes querrán los americanos que lideren el cotarro? los ugandeses, porque se fían de ellos, están mejor entrenados y hay suficientes vínculos -seis años cobrando cada mes el equivalente a cuatro o cinco veces lo que gana el ugandés medio al año, vinculan mucho- como para confiar en que se les pasará información o en caso de tema serio serán pro-americanos.

¿Por qué es la pesadilla del DoS? porque todas las empresas que proveen de ugandeses a las PMCs americanas están controladas por la familia presidencial de Uganda, que están metidos en mil lios y que cualquier día puede montarse un pifostio en la zona.

Los ugandeses no son como los sudafricanos, no se quedarán en paro cuando termine la gallina de los huevos de oro de la protección estática en Irak, que calculo le queda al menos un año como hasta ahora... 500$/mes para un ugandés es mucha pasta. Cuando estos hacen dos o tres años allí no solo han ahorrado lo suficiente para mandar al hijo mayor a una universidad de pago, sino que tienen la casa pagada, el coche comprado, las dos mujeres contentas porque tienen pasta de sobra, se montan un negociete (un bar, en esto son iguales que los ingleses montando bares de tetas en Tailandia o Bulgaria, jajaja) y encima en los PX han comprado un par de televisores de plasma tirados de precio.

Pero al DoS no le hace ni puñetera gracia, y han empezado a presionar al DoD para que en los contratos de protección estática baje aún más la cantidad de pasta disponible, así las empresas han empezado a meter keniatas y (ojo al tema), tíos de Sierra Leona y Liberia.

Creo que ha sido peor el remedio que la enfermedad, pero sin duda el fenómeno de los TCNs es uno de los más interesantes que ha dejado la expansión de actividades de las PMCs y sobre todo la salida de tropas de Iraq. Creo que no se repetirá en el futuro en otros escenarios porque Iraq era uno muy específico, donde contratar iraquíes era muchas veces una ruleta rusa porque al no existir documentación de mucha gente cualquiera podía entrar en una empresa y ser un infiltrado de Al Qaeda, JAM o las milicias sunnies. De hecho en Afganistán los TCNs son pocos en comparación con los afganos contratados, puesto que siempre es más fácil recurrir a los viejos de la aldea para que te diga quien es de que tribu y santas pascuas.
Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

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Re: ¡10.000 Ugandeses! Amenazas y oportunidades

Mensaje por Loopster » Vie Jul 23, 2010 5:39 pm

Mira por donde, dos ugandeses y un peruano muertos en un ataque en la International Zona de Bagdad. Un cohete hirió a otros quince contratistas de Triple Canopy.

Rocket hits Baghdad green zone escribió:Three private security contractors working for the US government in the heavily fortified green zone in Baghdad, the Iraqi capital, have been killed in a rocket attack.

"Two Ugandans and one Peruvian were killed and 15 people injured" by "a rocket fired into the international zone," the American embassy said in a statement, using another name for the green zone in central Baghdad.

"All of the dead and injured worked for a US government security contractor which protects US government facilities in Iraq ... two of the injured were American citizens," the embassy said on Thursday.

The dead and wounded all worked for Triple Canopy, a contractor based in Herndon, Virginia, founded by US special-forces veterans.

The green zone, which houses Iraqi government buildings, and several major embassies in addition to US interests, is the target of frequent rocket and mortar attacks.

US officials declined to say exactly where the rocket landed, but an Iraqi police source said it struck near the sprawling US embassy complex.

US forces handed full responsibility for "entry control points" that regulate movement into and out of the area to Iraqi authorities on June 1, 2010.
Cry havoc and unleash the hawgs of war - Otatsiihtaissiiststakio piksi makamo ta psswia

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